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Chris Olsen and Julie Burton on Amplifying Women's Voices

Feb 16, 2022
 

Season 3, Episode 6

Summary:

Today's episode tells the story of two powerhouses in the world of writing who joined forces to elevate the words, stories and writing of women. Chris Olsen is dedicated to amplifying women's voices through her social enterprise My Founder Story. Julie Burton is an author, co host of Her Next Chapter podcast and founder of Modernwell, the first female-centered co working collaborative space in Minneapolis. The two share about their individual ventures and their new joint collaboration, Publish Her, a female founded hybrid publishing company.

 

Links:

Buy the Book: Her Path Forward: 21 Stories of Transformation and Inspiration

Modernwell My Founder Story | Her Next Chapter

Chris and Julie recommend: Still Writing | On Writing | Bird by Bird

Champion YOU Group Coaching

  

Transcript:

Michael Kithcart:  

Hello, I'm Michael Kithcart, high performance leadership coach and the creator of Wynning Your Way. Welcome to the Champions of RISK podcast. A podcast that highlights ways to tread through the uncertainty with more courage and confidence and champion those who have taken the challenge to make their vision come to life. Today we are talking about amplifying women's voices with two guests who are committed to supporting women business owners and helping more female voices be heard and published. Chris Olsen is dedicated to amplifying women's voices through her social enterprise My Founder Story, a storytelling and publishing platform. She is passionate about empowering women business founders in confidently communicating their purpose and impact setting them up for entrepreneurial success. Since 2018, My Founder Story has donated more than $220,000 in grants and services to women. Julie Burton is an author, co host of her Next Chapter podcast and founder of Modernwell, the first female centered co working in collaborative space in Minneapolis, which is dedicated to empowering women through connection, wellness and creative freedom. Together, Chris and Julie have a joint collaboration, Publish Her, a female founded hybrid publishing company dedicated to elevating the words, stories and writing of women. Their first book under the Publish Her umbrella is Her Path Forward, 21 Stories of Transformation and Inspiration. Welcome, Julie and Chris.

Julie Burton:  

Thank you

Chris Olsen:  

Thank you, Michael, glad to be here.

Michael Kithcart:  

I'm so glad to be talking to both of you was at the launch of the Her Path Forward, which was just a fabulous event. And we'll make sure that people have a link to be able to buy that book, because the stories are truly inspiring. So I just want to kick it off because you both have deep roots in writing. So why is it important for all of us, but especially women, to write?

Chris Olsen:  

I think Julie should start because Julie is the founder of the you know, Modernwell writing studio, which is an evolution of something so-

Julie Burton:  

So, yes. So, I, Nina Batson, local writer, Modernwell member, and I, started the Twin Cities Writing Studio in 2015. Because we felt like, there were, we - she was like my first writer, friend in the Twin Cities. And I have a background in journalism and did a lot of writing, I mean, all of my writing kind of solo. And I was really feeling like I needed a writers community. So somebody introduced me to Nina, we established this wonderful friendship, and that centered really around writing. And we were talking one day and said to each other, there's gotta be other cool writers in this town, right? And so we decided to kind of throw it out there on Facebook. And we developed this the Twin Cities Writing Studio and we rented space out of Hopkins Center for the Arts. So the story is important because it evolves into - Twin Cities Writing Studio evolved into Modernwell, Writing Studio, because Modernwell was formed out of a need for women to come together in a physical space. And not only write, but work, and create, and connect. And the... back to your question. The the importance in all of this, to me, is about: Women tend to do it all, and do it all sort of inside of our heads, right, and just and just kind of work through. But the power of our stories is where we really shine and even thinking about Modernwell, and, and the roots of Modernwell, it's about the actual well. Like I envisioned the biblical sense of the word, where where people gathered around the well. And what did they do at the well, is they told stories. They shared stories that your shared, you know, recipes, or whatever they were doing back in, you know, biblical times. But, but the power of women's stories has always been a thread that binds us and, and that really makes the world a better place. So I think, you know, that's where Chris and I for sure, come together. She's been doing. She's been on a similar path, I'll let her share but in her own work, and the fact that we came together just obviously felt very organic.

Chris Olsen:  

I would add to that, that I think story- for women, writing changes women's lives. I mean, I think it's the ability to you know, share your story with the world and, and, you know, as Julie was talking about the community aspect of it, I had, was a member of several different working co working spaces, until I found Modernwell, and then I found the Writing Studio first and connected with that group. And then you know, became a member of Modernwell. And to me that was life changing. I think the ability to write with other women and to share your story. And to be vulnerable is really, really important. And so we're, I'm all for that, obviously Julie is all for that so.

Michael Kithcart:  

And since the two of you really do focus on having women be able to share their stories and give them tools and resources and ways to do it, and connect them. How often though, do you hear women just say, like, I don't have any stories to tell. Or, I don't know what I would write or, like, it feels like it takes a lot of coaxing to get us going.

Chris Olsen:  

I do think that women, I mean, just, in general, women have a hard time sort of singing their own praises, and, and acknowledging, you know, just because society, right, and so I think what it takes is a community of people to be sort of your cheerleader, and - or a coach, a writing coach, someone who can, you know, sort of help you with the discipline part of it of, you know, writing regularly, and then that cheerleader, part of sort of, like, you can do it, this is a great story. And there is something really powerful in the Writing Studio, you know, we write for 20 minutes, or whatever it is, and then we share what we've written. And that is, where you make those connections. And, you know, the world seems a little smaller, and it's sort of like, wow, that person has been through that as well. So there's, I think a lot of it is really, you know, the encouragement piece and, and, and a desire to be or, you know, the courage to be vulnerable and share your own truth.

Julie Burton:  

And we all have seasoned writers, beginning writers, we all have that imposter syndrome, right? Like, who am I to-? Nobody cares what I have to say, my ideas are not that important. They're not that unique there that, you know, nobody really is going to read what I wrote, you know, we all go through that. And I think that to Chris's point, it takes sort of that communal space to be able to say, Yes, Chris, your story matters. And yes, we want to hear it. And, you know, and we'll be cheering you along, to share that. Because we, especially women, I think we're hard on ourselves. And we, you know, a lot of times, it feels like men, just their stories are so important on everything they have to say, you know, they're but women are kind of, I mean, again, I'm, I'm being sort of stereotypical, but, but I think I think that, that women have a harder time speaking their truth, and that we need that connectivity to sort of have the strength and the courage to put ourselves out there.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes. I absolutely agree from all the say, from personal experience to the all that all rings true. And Chris, your business, you are the founder of My Founders Story. So you specifically help women entrepreneurs tell their story better, right,

Chris Olsen:  

Yeah.

Michael Kithcart:  

So tell us a little bit about how that came about.

Chris Olsen:  

So the way that came about was in a position I was in formerly, we developed a business planning course, that was an 18 week course. And at the end of the course, the women had to stand up in front of the room and, and pitch their business to sort of a shark tank scenario, a panel of mock investors. And, you know, I had helped these women, I had, you know, been part of designing that curriculum and help the women who participated in the course. And I was sure they're ready to get up and pitch their business. And then as they all got up to pitch their business, they couldn't do it, they sort of all froze this entire group of women, they stumbled, they couldn't look at people, they, you know, where they were fumbling with technology, it was just sort of like this moment for me where I was like, Oh, my gosh, we've failed these women, like, we sent them through this 18 week course, and they can't even pitch their business. So I at that point, came up with this idea to sort of help people like what is it that helps you get really grounded in your, in your story? And that's your why. It's sort of like, what's your purpose? What's your reason for doing what you're doing? And so, I, on my own, started developing this curriculum, and then it, you know, formed into my founder story, which is really an organization that helps women get to their purpose, and then how are they communicating that to the world. And we use sort of, like traditional storytelling models that, you know, help people tell engages the brain when they're telling them certain things like that. So, but the reason is also, because in business women receive far fewer resources to launch and grow their small businesses. And if they can't pitch their business, you know, it makes it even worse. So I was sort of like, you have to as the foundational level, be able to pitch your business, right? Even if you're not going to ask for money ever, but just to you know, for partners or whomever so, so it sets you up for success because you need to be able to you know, confidently communicate your, your purpose and impact for your business.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes. So I can see the correlation between your two companies even before you merged, you know, joined forces for other reasons. But how did you two meet?

Chris Olsen:  

Well, we met here.

Julie Burton:  

Here, we said, Chris's office! Yeah, we met here. And I don't know exactly, I think I just wanted to meet Julia, we just set up a coffee or whatever. And, and we realized we had a lot of similarities in our kind of career journey of marketing and, and writing and things like that. So sort of that instant connection, and then we shared an office for a while. And so that's when we started having conversations about first it was a magazine, like, we do a modern wall magazine, and then the idea of an anthology came up and, and during that whole time, Julia was like, I really want to start a publishing company. And I was like, I really want to focus in companies. So.

Michael Kithcart:  

Okay, so did you decide to start Publish Her first? Or did you decide to do the anthology first? Ah...

Chris Olsen:  

I think it was all

Julie Burton:  

It was simultaneous.

Chris Olsen:  

Yes,

Julie Burton:  

We knew we, we knew we wanted to do a publishing company. And we and we said, we kind of said, Okay, let's, let's try it, let's kick it off with this book and see and see how it goes. And so the anthology came on as a result of, of wanting to tap into the Modernwell community. And because we have so many incredible writers in our membership, and then just kind of the well; the Modernwell-well, that which extends, you know, around the world, actually. And so we wanted to share, we wanted to share essays of transformation and growth from from the Modernwell community. And so we put a call for submissions out and got hundreds of them and, and put together this wonderful anthology filled with inspiring stories of growth and joy and pain. And it just, it's amazing. And that's it goes back to, you know, kind of your original question, Michael, about, you know, why? Why women need to write. And it's really, because sharing stories and giving the gift of your story allows gives other people the permission to say, Ah, yes, okay, I feel that way, too. This is my story, whether whether they write it, or just even acknowledge it in their head or in their journal or something, but like owning owning your story and giving yourself permission to share it with the world, or, or with the journal or with a friend or anything, it just, it ties us together. And it just, it's the human connection.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yeah, I love that. You can't see it on the podcast, but I'm smiling from ear to ear. With them, they, what else would you add to that? Like, what do you really want to accomplish with publisher, which, by the way, is awesome name? Love it. But what do you what do you want to come out of this?

Chris Olsen:  

Well, we wanted to be a different kind of hybrid publishing company, because Julie had published, I had several clients. So I've helped through the publishing process with traditional and hybrid publishers and kind of was collecting notes about what things didn't work. And you know, Julie and I talked a lot about that. And so we talked about how we want it to be different. And one of the things that comes up a lot with hybrid publishers is a lot of hidden expenses like these add ons, right? Like, oh, we want to do that you have to add on. And so we, right out of the gate, were like, we want to have a set price, we want to be transparent about it, we want to be transparent about the process. So that was one thing that was really important to us. And then the other piece that pretty much all publishers do is take a percentage of royalties for it from the author. And we don't want to do that we want the author to have all of their royalties for their book sale. So so we it's set up in a way that you retain the royalties for your book sales. And then really just both of our communities. Because we've got the amazing Modernwell community and My Founder Story community, and like how can we get our communities behind these women authors to sort of rally them and things like that. And then, you know, of course, Julie, who's amazing, like she's always rallying people and, you know, I think that's, that's a big, a big differentiator. You know, I mean, she's, she's built an amazing community of writers and readers and, you know, workers and so...

Julie Burton:  

As of you! (laughing)

Michael Kithcart:  

(laughing) Yes. We don't have to demonstrate within the podcast of how women don't lay their successes here, we can identify them right here on this episode. And I can, you know, I was at the launch party for Her Path Forward. Wildly attended, and it was this the energy in the room

was exactly that:  

people championing others, cheering them along, acknowledging the the grace, the strength, the courage that it took to share because some of the stories in Her Path Forward are really remarkable. I mean, the transformation that has come through some life situations is I mean, I still like some of them make me cry. So with that just to demonstrate, like, the strength in numbers is really like that. So, you know, when you think about, if you're talking to a potential writer, maybe somebody who's already written a lot of a book, and she just doesn't know what to do, or, you know, maybe even how Publish Her specifically could, could help her like, what would you say to all of those podcast listeners right now who are just ready to be published? How will you support them?

Chris Olsen:  

Well, if you're ready, right, that's the key, because a lot of people aren't quite there yet. We've had lots of meetings over it, since we launched with people who are sort of still in progress, which is great. But if you're ready, the process is, you know, fairly straightforward. We have, we ask people to upload their manuscript for our website, fill out a questionnaire, Julie and I review all of those, we read the manuscripts, we have conversations about, like, are there holes, do they need something? So we do that first sort of editorial, look at those, and then we decide. And then we typically set meetings with the authors, and we let them know, here's what the, here's what the price is, here's what the process is, here's what the timeline is. That's the other thing too, our timeline is a lot shorter than traditional publishers, it takes around three months for us. It takes up to, at least a year, for most publishers, even hybrid publishers, some hybrid publishers, you can't even get in right away. So that's the other piece is sort of being accessible. And then the other piece is just buying book inventory, like most hybrid publishers require that you buy your own inventory. If you don't want to buy book inventory, you don't have to with Publish Her, you can just have your book on Amazon, and and it's available, and you still get all those royalties and things like that. So, so, so it's pretty straightforward.

Julie Burton:  

Yeah, we, yeah, I think, to Chris's point, you know, we've - if you have an idea, right, if you're out there listening, and you're like, I have a book idea, we would say, you know, what, flesh out that idea, you know, work work with, you know, a writing group, a book coach, somebody to kind of get that book really going, and really in a place where, like Chris was saying, like, it's, it's pretty much ready to go. We at this point, we do have some developmental editors that we work with, and that we can, you know, send you off, you know, on that path. But at this point, we're, we're really looking for pretty, you know, pretty much completed manuscripts. We do copy editing, and those kinds of things, but if you're still in the developmental editing stage, we'd say, you know, wait, go with that, do what you need to do. And we do have resources that we're happy to share with you. And then when it's, it's when you feel and you're, you know, editor feel like it's ready to, you know, pretty much ready to go to press, then then you would submit to us.

Michael Kithcart:  

Okay, got it. Now, both of your other companies, though, the companies that you have individually, also support women in their writing journeys, right?

Julie Burton:  

Yes.

Michael Kithcart:  

So. So Chris, with My Founder Story, how, if women are just wondering how to get started and want to get over that trepidation, how do they start?

Chris Olsen:  

Well, we have, you know, My Founder Story has free courses online for clarifying your why and developing your story, like a short story, your short founder story. And then we're, we also have a course that's about writing your business memoir, which is an eight week course, which we're will be bringing soon to Modernwell. And so you know, if people are still in that developmental phase of doing their business memoir, we will help them with that. And of course, Modernwell has tons of classes for writers. I mean, besides the writing groups on Tuesdays and Thursdays, there's lots and lots of-

Julie Burton:  

We are, yes, and we are we're developing, we're developing the Writing Studio. So it you know, we will have more we had more classes, we hope to get another one going. And then yes, so you can, you know, check our website for for writing class offerings that we have. But I think in general, to your point, Michael, you know, Modernwell, it's funny, because originally, our writing group was really our foundational members here. And we would have people walk in to Modernwell and say, I'm not a writer, can I, I'm a business person, can I still be a member of Modernwell? And so I want to say that like, Modernwell is for everybody. I mean, we have business coaches, we have you know, marketers, we have doctors, we have lawyers, we have accountants, we have financial advisors, we we have everyone. What we, what I think is, is really cool and unique about Modernwell, is that there is this creative energy here. And no matter what, whether you're a writer, or a poet or photography, photographer or an accountant, right, we all need creativity in our lives and in our work. And so I think that when you walk into modern well, you feel that you feel that energy of creativity and have kind of this expansive thinking. And I've talked to a lot of our members who are not creatives, but they have talked about that a really appreciating that having that energy around them that it has helped them kind of, you know, reinvent in their businesses and think creatively, even in non creative fields.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes, yes. Well, and we all are all creative in our own ways. And so sometimes we just need help bringing that out. We talked a little bit about how how women go through that that writing process. I'm curious, because now you're publishers, and you went through the Her Path Forward, with the 21 stories. What did you learn about yourself? Editing, reading, going through hundreds of stories, as you said, to determine what was going to be in the book?

Julie Burton:  

You know, um, I think, I think Chris, and I learned a lot about were, in terms from a business standpoint, in terms of where we shine, and where, you know, Chris, is his super gifted at sort of project management and, and task and task management. And I'm more more of like, the vision creative sort of person. So I think it helped us in the sense of figuring out kind of our business structure a little bit. For me, it also kind of kicked me back to in a positive way, of my own book. And, and, and I went through a hybrid publisher out of Berkeley, it for The Self-Care Solution: A Modern Mother's Must-Have Guide to Health and Well-Being. And I remember the process and how hard it was for me to sort of let go, and you know, getting to this final stage where it was like, oh, but we should edit this a little bit more, we should... And I found myself doing that a little bit with with Her Path Forward, with the book. And I remember my editor, with my publisher said to me, okay, Julia, it's time to let go. And Chris at one point was like, we're done. (laughing) We're not going back anymore, on these stories. And so I think I just learned that, it's probably just like, oh, yeah, there's that perfectionism again, and there's that not being able to let go again. So I definitely, I definitely saw that. But I also saw just just the infinite possibility, of, of, you know, sharing these stories. And I learned about myself in reading all these all the stories that were submitted. Yeah, I would agree that I think there's just that powerful connection piece of like, every, and we had to read hundreds of stories. So it sort of like - and that was really hard to, to narrow it down to 21. And figure out like, which, because we wanted a really wide variety people in different life stages, people in different situations, like, we wanted to make sure we had a nice, you know, variety of stories. And so, I mean, I found I was getting really connected to the stories and these people. Many, some I knew, some I didn't know. So it was just a really powerful process. And I think it's just, I learned like how connected we really are like, there's always a, there's sort of a thread in everybody's story that you can relate to. It might not be your whole, you know, story, but there's always like a little piece where it's like, oh, my gosh, I've experienced that are, you know, I feel that in my heart. So just that, like, as big as the world is, it's, we're so, we're all so connected.

Michael Kithcart:  

What does - what's risky about writing?

Julie Burton:  

Oh, just, a feeling of like, of being judged. You know, that just raw, vulnerable feeling that someone is going to read what I wrote, what I think, what I feel; and is gonna have a judgement about it. And you know, and that's really, really scary for everybody.

Chris Olsen:  

Mm hmm. I agree. And I think that's what prevents a lot of people from writing. Even in a journal I've heard I've heard people say, like, someone read their journal when they're younger, or whatever. So they know they don't journal anymore. And I'm like, because there's that vulnerability piece of like, being judged if someone read your journal and so I don't know I just I think that's the hardest part is getting over that like, caring what people think. The truth of the matter is that being vulnerable is what connects us to other people, you know, and it's what we see and other people. You know, it's it allows us - and that's what helps us, you know, make connections and build communities of, you know, people who've been through similar experiences or have similar values or whatever, like, you don't get any of that if you're not brave, and you don't show up and share your story and tell your story. And then just, from a historical context, like women's stories aren't represented as much, if you look at history books, right, so we're denying children the opportunity to learn about women, what women have contributed. And so if we can elevate that, and even a small way, I think we can, you know, we're changing, we're changing narratives and changing perspectives.

Julie Burton:  

I think now, too, I think it's, it's, there's a, there's a fear and a risk, because there's so many taboo areas too, that, that we, I think people are really afraid to say the wrong thing. And, you know, with, with the cancel culture and art, and if, and so I think that is also inhibiting people. You know, the truth is, we all have good and beauty in us, and we all have darkness and evil and like, and so, and so it's sort of like, I think there's a little bit of a, a real fear right now, that the way that we show up on the page is, is, is going to be judged. And it really, and it is being judged. And that's real. Right. So it's like, I think that it's tricky now for a lot of writers to feel like they can, you know, really be honest, and, and have things not be interpreted in a certain way, that they're demonized, or called, you know, labeled certain ways. So I think, I think we're in a tricky time a little bit with with, with being vulnerable and sharing our stories, because, again, we all have good and bad in us. We all have, you know, just the most noble hearts and also sometimes not so noble hearts, and we're human beings. And I think that sometimes is really tricky for people right now.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yeah, I just finally got around to reading Untamed.

Chris Olsen:  

Oh, sure.

Michael Kithcart:  

And, okay, tell me the author's name because I can't -

Chris Olsen:  

Glennon Doyle

Michael Kithcart:  

And she actually wrote in a piece, it's in the book, she's like, I'm scared to even write this right now. Because the books not going to come out for another year. But she did. Anyway, she did it. And I actually really appreciated that it's almost like social media has made it easier than ever to tell your story to put things out there. And at the same time, has given you 1000 more reasons why NOT to tell your story.

Chris Olsen:  

Yeah.

Michael Kithcart:  

So, how do you balance that out? How do you still be brave enough to to share what you've experienced so that others can know that they're not alone?

Chris Olsen:  

I don't know. I think part of it is like, not caring. (laughing) On a certain level. It's like, I don't care what people think. I'm unapologetically me. And I know that everyone's not gonna love me. I'm not a $20 bill, everyone's not gonna love me. Right? Like, um, I just, I feel like you just had some level you have to be okay with, with knowing that some people won't, your story won't resonate with them, or they won't appreciate it. And that's okay. And then don't read the comments, like,

Julie Burton:  

It's evolving! You know, we're all evolving and changing and learning and growing. And so, it - yeah, it's... I think there's the like, like Chris said, like, just owning your story, owning your worth, your story is worthy of sharing, and leave any gaps that leave you with that, right. That's all we can do.

Chris Olsen:  

And there is something to be learned in that feedback, too. Like, even if it's uncomfortable feedback, if, you know, we may not know our biases, or, you know, there might be a feedback that is sort of like in the moment, it's uncomfortable, but then you digest and go oh, yeah, I just saw that I realized that right. So as you know, as awful as canceled culture can be I mean, there's some validity in some of, you know, the feedback that we're getting and how are we using that to, you know, look at ourselves and go okay, maybe there's room for change here?

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes, absolutely. So, since you have both have such deep backgrounds and experiences in writing, what are some of your favorite writing books? Or your favorite one?

Chris Olsen:  

Well, my favorite one is Bird by Bird. I mean, I just I just got that one on audio too. I have a book, and I got it on audio too. And I will just re-listen to it because it's just - the narrator's not even a, you know, the author but, whoever's narrating it she's got kind of a southern accent and I just really love listening to it because the book is so good. And I give that one to anyone who participates in our writing courses too, because I think it's sort of foundational to.

Julie Burton:  

Yeah, I love that one. And I love Stephen King's On Writing. I love, and Danny Shapiro wrote one - Still Writing? I think. But a really good one, I think it is called Still Writing. On writing that, those are, those are probably my top three.

Michael Kithcart:  

We'll put links in the show notes on that so people can, can find them. And I also, I always the advice about, just think about your favorite authors, the people that you read, and you just love their voices. Yeah, you can learn so much from just reading other people.

Chris Olsen:  

That's the thing too, I agree. I like to me, it's really important to be a reader or even a listener, like, if you like audiobooks, just consuming books, is really, really important. I mean, because you're, you can tune into those voices that, you know, Oh, I like the way she writes or like her voice, or I, like, you know, sort of whatever, the style that she has, and I think you can learn a lot about what you love and appreciate by just consuming a lot of books. And, and, and, you know, not that you want to copy someone per se but find what, you know, find what speaks to you and, and tap into that.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yeah, I love that.

Julie Burton:  

(inaudible) be a reader of all of all, you know, even even maybe genres that you're not, you know, drawn to, just to kind of get different voices. Yeah, cuz I'm, I love memoir, but my book club, I'm in a book club, and there's a lot of like, fantasy lover, book lovers in the group. But I'm like, these books I would never ever read on my own. But because I'm in the book club, and I love the ladies in my book club. I'm like, Okay, I'll listen to it, you know, 'cause I usually get them on audio. But there is something about sort of getting those different genres, where it's like, I would never, I would never listen to that.

Michael Kithcart:  

Okay, so those who want to join Chris's fantasy - (laughing)

Chris Olsen:  

(laughing) I don't mean romantic fantasy. I mean, like dragons and princesses fantasy.

Michael Kithcart:  

Okay, that's a good clarification.

Chris Olsen:  

(laughing) I see where your mind went.

Michael Kithcart:  

So I'm interested in what are you, each

of you:  

What are you a Champion of?

Chris Olsen:  

Well, women, of course. I mean, like women, women in writing, and women in business, in particular, for me, I think, you know, I'm just on a personal mission to amplify women in business, because, like, 95% of business books are, you know, written by men and women have thriving businesses, and, you know, there's, you know, several billion dollar businesses now that are owned by, founded by, women, and it's

sort of like:  

where are those books? You know, where are those, those stories to share? So I'm really passionate about championing that piece of it.

Julie Burton:  

And I would say I'm, I'm a champion of having people... inspiring people to find the spark in themselves. I love to see... see people sort of find their magic. And, and, and sort of being a part of that process, and I witnessed it a lot. It modeled well, and seeing people, you know, maybe come in with an idea, or they're just kind of kicking around, you know, a career move or even a personal move. And then just like kind of seeing people come into their power and, and kind of get that courage that are put my podcast with Steph Pierce is you know, Her Next Chapter. And that's a lot of what we talk about is, is giving yourself permission, and sort of the courage to look for different possibilities, external and internal.

Michael Kithcart:  

Isn't that the truth? The two, boy, sometimes you think you're looking for things external and everything you're searching for is on the inside. So that that's great. I appreciate the two of you taking time to talk. Congratulations on Publish Her, on Her Path Forward. I love it. How can people follow both of you? Julie, you go ahead and start.

Julie Burton:  

Modernwell, you can find us on any social platform, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, @Modernwellco.

Chris Olsen:  

Publish Her is just @PublishHerPress on Instagram and Facebook and that's our website for Publish Her as well.

Julie Burton:  

And my founders story -

Chris Olsen:  

And My Founder Story is @MyFounderStory on

Michael Kithcart:  

Great, Chris. Julie, thank you so much for being on the Champions of RISK podcast.

Chris Olsen:  

Thank you Michael

Michael Kithcart:  

Make 2022 the year of Champion YOU. Chances are you're having success and working hard. Wouldn't it be great to accomplish your goals with more energy, joy and sense Instagram, you know, social, all social. And myfounderstory.com. of calm? Gain the tools and community you've been seeking for more satisfying success through Champion YOU Group Coaching. Join other business and sales professionals each month for interactive sessions on high performance topics that move you forward faster with more focus and competence. Reach a new level of growth this year by investing in yourself and your future through Champion You Group Coaching. See details in the show notes or go to MichaelWkithcart.com.

 

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