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Laura Caroon on Being a Lady Boss

Jan 05, 2022
 

Season 3, Episode 1

Summary:

What does it mean to be a Ladyboss? Laura Caroon reflects that most women she knows are already leaders in some way, they just might not recognize it. She shares about co-founding Ladyboss Midwest, which empowers and connects women leaders, and their upcoming FLOW retreat is this March. Additionally, Laura talks about her experience being elected to Moorhead city council and working with She Should Run, a nonprofit that helps give women the tools to run a successful political campaign.

 

Links:

Register for Ladyboss Midwest's FLOW retreat

Champion You Group Coaching

 

Transcript:

Michael Kithcart:  

Hello, I'm Michael Kithcart, high performance sales coach and the creator of the Wynning Your Way framework. Welcome to the Champions of RISK podcast where we examine the many aspects of risk so that we can all face uncertainty with more courage and confidence together. Ladies, we know who really runs the world or should but there are days when we need to be reminded that we are powerful beyond measure that we're closer to our goals than we think and that we are indeed the boss, and that there is room for all of us to thrive. Even when we know it logically, sometimes we get in our own way, or we need support. Am I right? So we're going to tackle this and more today with my guest, Laura Caroon. She's a creative strategist, artist and entrepreneur, that includes being co founder of Ladyboss Midwest. It's a company community and movement intensely focused on empowering and connecting women. It's based in Fargo, North Dakota, Go Bison. Lady boss bridges, the digital and physical world by facilitating social media and professional development events, and upcoming annual summit that we're going to talk about workshops, networking events, and Ladyboss podcast, plus a book club so much there, Laura, welcome to the Champions of RISK podcast.

Laura Caroon:  

Hey, Michael, thanks so much for having me.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes, absolutely. So let's just talk about what made you and co founder Danyel Mo, start Ladyboss Midwest.

Laura Caroon:  

Yeah, absolutely. So Danyel and I work together at Concordia College and the marketing office years ago. And we really wanted to create a conference for women. We wanted to do something that nobody else was doing and have nobody telling us what we could or couldn't do.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes.

Laura Caroon:  

So we created the Ladyboss Summit. And because we're both marketers, we decided we were going to create a Facebook group and see if there was even any interest in something like this before we really dove headfirst into it. And at first, it felt a little weird, because it was you know, just the two of us kind of talking to each other, but then we invited our friends and their friends of mine, their friends. And before we knew it, we had 800 women in this group, and we only had 50 tickets to sell. So we sold out immediately. And it was so exciting. And it was such a great opportunity. And we saw all of these women who are wanting more. Who were wanting to connect, who wanted to be empowered, who wanted to learn. And so we were like, what do we do with them? What do we do with this great opportunity that we have in front of us?

Michael Kithcart:  

I love that. So what do you think was the difference for people - so 800 Women signed up? How is Ladyboss Midwest, different from other women's groups, networking events? What's the attraction that made so many people follow immediately?

Laura Caroon:  

Yeah. So you know, partially, I think we aren't just for women who are in kind of the typical nine to five role who are in corporations who's-who's boss will pay for them to go to a networking lunch kind of thing. We're really, for all professional, ambitious women were for the entrepreneurs were for the solopreneurs, who are looking to have a network. But we also, were really excited about talking about issues that were affecting women that weren't being talked about. So oftentimes, you know, you'll have a great women's networking group, but sponsored by a company or an organization that maybe wouldn't want you to talk about certain things because it doesn't make them you know, doesn't put them in a great light. And because we didn't have anybody telling us what we could do. We were able to talk about those things. And to be really honest and open.

Michael Kithcart:  

And what are some of those topics? What came up immediately?

Laura Caroon:  

Yeah, so things like women in the leadership positions in companies, things like you know, how you're treated as a woman things like wage gap, women in technology, being being creative, in your job in your career, knowing what your value is, even things like sexual harassment. There are a lot of different topics that that we've kind of gotten into. And it's been really great to have a platform to be able to do that.

Michael Kithcart:  

And how do you determine what topics you're going to bring forward?

Laura Caroon:  

You know, some of that depends on what's happening in the world. What are our common experiences are what experts that we find that we are able to talk. So in 2021 I've kind of been designating it as the year of burnout for women 2020. We were all, you know, thrown into this global pandemic, and things changed for us, we were at home or teaching our kids while we're trying to work at the same time and not having childcare, or caring for our families who are sick. All of that felt like, you know, this is a temporary thing. And then we got into 2021. And it didn't feel quite so temporary. I felt like just this long process that we weren't really getting out of. So learning what is what is that new normal? How do we kind of get back to our vibrancy, our creativity, that spark? And, you know, burnout is something that all of these other women's issues really contribute to that. For women, it's not something it's not like, Oh, you're just not feeling it anymore. Just tired, go take a nap. It's, you know, systemic issues that affect that burnout for women specifically. So things like paid family leave, and childcare benefits, those are things that are really bubbling up to the top that we're realizing we need to be talking about that we need to figure it out. So that we don't have women leaving the workplace in droves, because they don't have childcare for their kids, or they don't feel safe, putting them back in school, you know, all of those kinds of things, policing women's bodies, making sure that women have the support, they need at work to have flexibility. Even simple things like mother's rooms, in the office, supporting new moms, when they return. All of those things, just filter in and, you know, kind of creates a bad situation for women.

Michael Kithcart:  

Right? And it's ongoing, right? It's just like, you could have also spent another five minutes listing off more and more topics, it just is endless. So I, I appreciate what you're saying. And like, you know, all of these things contribute to burnout. And I'm curious kind of what your community has been saying to you. Because as a coach, I've seen this where some people really did struggle right off the bat, when the pandemic hit and the lockdown, some people adjusted well. But in 2021, to your point, so many of us, self included, like hit this wall. And really just struggled to, and we're so used to being able to push through. You know, persevering, figuring it out, bootstrapping, whatever we need to do. And like the things that we're working for are coping mechanisms for the last, you know, the prior 12 to 18 months, like, all of a sudden just stopped working. So you know, for what did you do to help support your community? What were some of the things that maybe you've heard from women in, you know, in Ladyboss that kind of, even really reflect the the year of burnout?

Laura Caroon:  

Yeah. So number one, I think, is having the conversation and talking about it. You know, as as women, we often kind of take on that like super woman thing, where we try to keep everything inside and be like, I can handle it, I can figure it out, I can do all these things, take on other people's stuff and make it your own. But at some point, you need to realize that burnout in particular, it's not just it's not just like a you thing, it's not just you can't handle it, or you're not good enough. It's, you know, it might be where you're at, at work isn't a great fit, it might be that there's just too much pressure coming from the top, it might be that you need more help - at work, at home. It's all kinds of things that pile on top and talking about it with other women in particular and saying like, here's what I'm going through, and they can tell you, Hey, I'm going through something similar. How do we work through this together? How do we help each other? How do we make change? How do we let our our supervisors, our bosses, our CEOs know that like, we're all dealing with this, and the unless you want us to leave because we're unable to work anymore; we're seeking a different employment opportunity. We need to change something together. And it's just it's really helpful, I think, mentally to know that it's not just you going through it. The other thing you know, we've been talking a lot about self care and Ladyboss for the last few years. And in 2021 self care isn't negotiable. It's not something that is It's not a, We should do it, it's We have to do it. We have to take care of our bodies, we have to take care of our mental health. Because you put everything else at risk. If you don't have those things, you can't be successful in business, if your body is feeling - if your mind isn't where it needs to be. So putting those things in place, making time for it, putting it in your schedule in some way, finding help, so that you can do that. That's something that I have learned, that's been a big piece of what I needed to do in 2021. Because you know, 2020, I was like, I can do all the things, I'll figure it all out. And then it was like, nope, the burnout happens. And you need to figure out how to get out of that.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yeah, it's, it's so true. And it's ongoing, because life in general is is uncertain, right? If we really start to break it down. But I think it's been the pandemic that's really highlighted, just how much we operate in uncertainty, how uncomfortable it is, how hard it can be on us physically and mentally. And we need new coping skills, and not just coping skills, we just need flat out new skills, modifications, alterations, whatever you want to call them, right? So that we are putting ourselves in a position where we can really thrive at home at work in society. And it's, if I'm being optimistic, it's like one of the good things that's come out of COVID is just this recognition. Like you said, it's no longer nice to have, it's a have to have.

Laura Caroon:  

Exactly. You know, for me in 2021, I knew that self care, and my physical wellness was something that I needed to work on. And, you know, as much as I tried to just, you know, fit it in by myself, I needed to get a coach so that I had to do it. So that I mean, making an investment in a financial investment and investing my time put it on my calendar, I know that somebody is waiting for me at the gym in the morning, so I have to go. That makes me do it. And I always feel better doing it. I'm so glad that I did it. But for me, I need that accountability.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yep. I was just having this conversation this morning with my workout group we were talking about what other additional accountability do we need, aside from showing up these couple of times each week? So it's an ongoing piece. What does it mean to be a Ladyboss?

Laura Caroon:  

That's something that we ask every person that that requests to be part of one of our Facebook groups is: are you a Ladyboss? And I think it makes people pause and question, what does I mean? What does it mean to me? You know, for us, it's not about being - being a boss, maybe in your job or at your, you know, your organization, you don't have to be a boss of somebody to be lady boss. It's more of a mindset. It's about being the boss of your own life, and your own success, being responsible for that. Empowered, empowering others. That's really what being a lady boss is all about.

Michael Kithcart:  

Mmhmm. It's an attitude. On some level, is what that sounds like to me.

Laura Caroon:  

Yes.

Michael Kithcart:  

And then let's not over also, let's not skip over the fact that we also need more lady bosses in office in, you know, running businesses, whether they're corporate businesses, when whether they're entrepreneurial businesses. We need more of that. And so in terms of like the services or the topics that you cover, through Ladyboss, how are you helping to support women in their careers so that they're reaching new levels?

Laura Caroon:  

Yeah.

Michael Kithcart:  

Hopefully leading more?

Laura Caroon:  

Yes. You know, building leaders is something that I'm very passionate about in the workplace, in communities. And, you know, women, women that I have found, they tend to have a hard time identifying as leaders, or even as entrepreneurs, even if they're running a small business themselves. And so we need to change that narrative a bit for women, we need to help women get that confidence to know you are a leader. Most women that I know are leading in some fashion, they might just not really recognize that they're leading in their work they're leading in their department doesn't necessarily have to be the entire organization that's relating but in their department with their colleagues. They can be leading in community groups, in Girl Scouts, at church, you know, in a volunteer organization leading their family, their kids. There's all these different ways that we are leaving And we need to feel empowered in that and to recognize that so something that we are passionate about it Ladyboss is finding ways that we can not only connect women, but give them some opportunities to learn and to grow. This past year, something that we were really excited about was we partnered with Gate City Bank out of Fargo here and taught man taught women all about money. So we looked at finances, we talked about budgeting, we talked about retirement and savings and credit, because that's something that is really empowering to know what's happening with your money. And it's really tough, if you don't know. There's not it, there's not a lot of freedom and not knowing where your money's going, or how to make that grow. But it's something that I think a lot of women shy away from, or feel like, they haven't been invited to that conversation, or they don't really understand. So they just kind of, you know, work around it or don't talk about it that much. So we need to be empowered in all areas of our life. We teach women about marketing and their business. We know so many women are their small business owner, and they're kind of running and doing it all themselves to want to help them in those different skills in their business. We want to talk about the different legal pieces of business, all kinds of different things. We're figuring out what is most important to women. Right, then during the pandemic, we were listening to our community and reaching out asking, What do you need help with right now? What are you struggling with? For a lot of them at the time it was, you know, I have a brick and mortar business. And we've always, you know, I've always sold face to face. And I have to sell online and I had to figure out how do I even make make an e commerce store? How do I ship these items? Like - what? How do I reach my customers now if they're not coming in to see me? So we do a lot of asking to figure out what women are needing and trying to fill those gaps and be a resource using our network of experts whenever we can.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yeah. What would you say is like the biggest risk to women? What's holding us back? What's the risk?

Laura Caroon:  

Yeah. It really goes back to what we were talking about before, Michael, I think that the biggest risk is women not having a seat at the table where decisions are being made. So in 2020, I got into politics, I made a run for city council here in Morehead, because I wanted to have a seat at the table. I wanted to use my voice to advocate for women and for girls and their futures. I'm a huge believer in representation in office. And I think that we need women in every level of government, we need working moms, we need BIPOC women, we need those perspectives. And those voices. I think that we need women to answer the call to run for office and to change that narrative. And I know that you've got a lot of incredible women who are listening to your podcast. So if any women who are out there even have an inkling or thinking about it, there's two organizations that I want to, I want to highlight for you check out. The first is called She Should Run. So they're a national nonpartisan nonprofit that wants to help you explore that possibility and give you the tools to run a successful campaign. So I was part of a cohort of 35 women from all across the country back in 2019, when I was thinking about running, and it was so incredible and inspiring and empowering and educational. And it was like a $25 course, like costs nothing or next to nothing. And it was so, so helpful. And so great to hear from other women across the country who were thinking about running. And the thing that stuck with me the most when I was talking with them is we all asked each other like when are you running? And I was like, Well, I'm gonna run in 2020. And so many of the women who were, like so smart, so qualified, like PhDs in political science and lawyers, and they're like, um, maybe five years, maybe later, I'm not I don't feel quite ready yet. And I'm like, what? Like, you're so qualified and you're ready. You gotta we gotta go. We got to do this. So the second one, if you're in Minnesota, there's a great organization called Women Winning that seeks to elect pro choice women across the state. So they endorsed me as a candidate when I ran for office in 2020. And they are an incredible resource and amazing cheerleaders for women who are running.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes, that, I'm so glad that that was one of the organizations that you brought up. I had the fortune of working - They were sharing office space with us when I was at Women Venture a number of years ago, and they do an amazing job getting women in office. So that's great. So now, are you a city council member?

Laura Caroon:  

Yes.

Michael Kithcart:  

Well heck, we needded to lead with that. Bad research on my end. Sorry, Laura.

Laura Caroon:  

I represent Ward two in Morehead City Council. I started in January. So it's been almost almost a full year.

Michael Kithcart:  

That is fantastic. And I love the call that you have made for all women to seek office.

Laura Caroon:  

You know, when you, you just have to be passionate, and want to help. Like, that's really the qualification for running is wanting to help your community. local office is so important to everyday life in your city, in your town in your county, and we need any more great women willing to step up and try it out. If you're I'll say this, too, if you're thinking about it, and you're maybe not quite ready, there's always different committees and commissions that you can be a part of. And that's a great taste in of what what elected office might be like, and understanding, you know, how all those things work and, and a great way to build connections if you want to run. So that's the public side of that question. And this is kind of like a long answer.

Michael Kithcart:  

That's okay!

Laura Caroon:  

(Unintelligible). So, like we talked about before, also, we also need women that are leading in the private sector. We need women who are in the C suite, we need women who are on the board, we need women who are leading companies, leading in HR, leading in all of those places. Businesses really decide when and how we work, how much money we're bringing home to our families, what kind of flexibility we have to take care of our kids, or elders when they're sick. And if women aren't part of that conversation, our perspectives and our lived experiences won't be fully taken into consideration. So we need to be there too.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes, yes, we do, Laura, and so very well said, and we are at a time right now, this is going back on the political side of things. And being an office, watching white men in particular, usually, like really trying to dictate what it is that we as women can do with our bodies. And so the reproductive issues that are going on right now, and the fact that we're, we're recording in 2021, it'll, I know this is going to air right at the beginning of 2022. But it's just like, really, honestly, we're having this conversation now. And we wouldn't be we wouldn't be if there were more women at the table. And this isn't even about what political preferences is. It's just like, do we really want other people to be deciding what it is that we can do with our bodies? And so I just I needed to go back to that, because it just pisses me off so much that we're even having this conversation.

Laura Caroon:  

It makes my blood boil. Like, just as we're talking about it. Because you're right, it's having this conversation is saying that women aren't full adults who are capable of making choices about their own bodies.

Michael Kithcart:  

Right. Yes. And so others need to determine that for us. And which transitions, you can now take that exact same phrase and apply it in the corporate life because that too, and we've all experienced it. It's one of the great reasons why I left I just got sick and tired of listening to white men tell me, you know, discounting my voice or being the only person at the table, and just wanting wanting a greater impact. And it takes I think I the last corporate job I left when I started my my business three and a half years ago. The one thing that makes me feel really good is that now there are more women leaders that make up that leadership team. And that I'm not the only - you know, it's not just one again. And getting that strength in numbers really does make a big difference. And so often as women because so many of us have only seen one person at the table, right one woman at the table and for us to get a different picture of what it can look like to be the majority to you know to be all women, or most. At the very, very least, not to just be the only one. And it's almost as equally distressing to see in this day and age, how often it is that there's just one woman in that leadership role. So what else can we do, Laura, what else should we be doing to get more women in leadership positions?

Laura Caroon:  

I was talking to a friend actually this week who is originally from Norway, and he was saying that there, they actually have quotas that they have to fill for boards or businesses, that they have to be half women. And-

Michael Kithcart:  

I love that

Laura Caroon:  

-being very intentional about it. It's not just a one, it'd be nice, or that'd be great. Someday, it's Nope, you have to, you have to have them represented, we have to do half women. So that's really interesting to see, you know, just making it a rule and then it becomes normal. And then it doesn't become something that you have to like, make sure to check off the box. It just is.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes. And thinking about that reminds me of Sweden, who, and this isn't the only country but I just think of my friend who has three children. And every time she had a child, she got a year off. Right? Yeah. And that was just like normal and couldn't believe that that is not what happens everywhere.

Laura Caroon:  

Yeah, so we think about paid family leave time we think about childcare. This is not something we have to reinvent, like, we just need to look to our neighbors and other parts of the globe who are already doing this. And ask them, how does it work for you? How do we implement that here? It's not impossible. It can work and it does work in all kinds of other countries.

Michael Kithcart:  

Very inspiring. So I do want to talk to you about because in addition to you serving your community, as a city council, representative, you are also an entrepreneur, yourself. Your background's in startup and small business. So what sparked that entrepreneurial spirit?

Laura Caroon:  

Oh, I feel like I've been pretty entrepreneurial. Since even when I was a kid, I was a Girl Scout and got to give a shout out to the Girl Scouts.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes, we do.

Laura Caroon:  

And entrepreneurship is a huge piece of what they they promote for for young girls, I started really my first real business. While I was still in college, I started a photography business. And this was back when digital photography was still very new and very expensive. He had to figure everything out as you went. But I, you know, kind of was bit by the entrepreneurial bug, then when I, you know, got a camera and I started this business, I started taking photos for weddings and families and senior photos. And I loved it. And I loved being an entrepreneur, I loved owning my own business. I loved figuring out the marketing, I loved figuring out all the administrative pieces, figuring out how to work with clients, how to get my name out there, that's where I learned to network, and connect with other business owners and how important that is. So that was the first, you know, my first real experience as an entrepreneur and kind of going it alone. Back then, this was back in 2005, that I started that. And there weren't, you know, there weren't blogs that I could read about all these things we didn't have like these community groups of women entrepreneurs that I could join, so much of it was just trial and error. And I hate trial and error. I just want someone to like tell me what to do, what not to do. But, you know, it was a lot, it was a great learning experience. And now I'm just so thankful to have opportunities to help other women who are getting their start and make it so they don't have to learn everything the hard way. And to connect them with resources, like, hey, you need an accountant. And here's a really great one that can help you figure out how to do a QuickBooks and how to do your taxes and what sales and use tax means. And, you know, all of those kinds of things that, you know, there is no like manual for starting a business. And that tells you everything that you need to know. You just have to figure it out. And every business is different. So it's been it's been incredible. Being an entrepreneur, I've helped be a part of several different businesses started at different businesses. Kind of going on that path and, and trying all kinds of new things.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yeah, yeah. Well, and how does Ladyboss support entrepreneurs? Because you said it's made up, It's really for every woman.

Laura Caroon:  

Right? So a huge piece is that those connections, we have so many women in our group we in our Fargo Moorhead, we have a Facebook group in Fargo Moorhead. Specifically, there's 8000 women in there. And every day, there's women asking for recommendations for different things, or who knows how to work this point of sale, or, you know, who can help me with this issue I'm having with, you know, a vendor, or software or whatever it is. And the women in the group are so happy to help each other. And they're like, looking for ways that they can be of service and be of help to somebody else. We have, like little groups that have formed within the lady boss group, we have, you know, women who are writers that have formed their own little group together, we have people who are solo entrepreneurs who have collaborated in different things, and really having that network is, is so essential business people ask me all the time, you know, like what, you know, kind of what my secret sauce or my secret to marketing is. And for me, it's relationships. It's having a network, building connections, being in relation with people. Because people work with people that they like, and people that they trust. And so you have to figure out how to, you know, how do I build relationships with people, they can trust me? And it's not a transactional thing, it takes time takes an investment. And putting yourself out there?

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes, well, and speaking of putting yourself out there, what, what would you say is the biggest risk that you've taken as an entrepreneur?

Laura Caroon:  

My husband was saying, I've taken a lot of big risks. I'm more of a risk taker than he is. I think, you know, first of all, leaving, leaving a job to work for myself, was a huge risk. I did it when I was young. In my mid 20s, when I didn't have kids or a ton of responsibility to financial obligations, and student loans that I had to be responsible for. That was a pretty big risk. In 2013, actually, one of my favorite projects I've ever worked on, was the first time that I put on a retreat for women. And back then it was just like this idea I had in my mind, like, I just was like, I have to do this thing I need to, I need to make this retreat. And I didn't have any money to make it happen. So I had to go to the bank and ask for a loan, which this was, you know, after 2008, and, you know, banks were like, not handing out cash by any means. So I, you know, had put together my my business plan for this retreat, my proposal and like, what my projections were and what the impact was going to be, how much money I was going to put in what I was hoping to get in return all of those things, and go to the bank and go to a banker who was a guy, you know, and tell him, I'm going to do this thing for women. And here's how many 1000s of dollars I need from you, so that I can do this. And they did it, they gave me the money. So it was like a huge risk for me. I feel like I'm gonna take on this debt, essentially. So I can create this thing, but it was so worth it in the end. And it was one of the best experiences of my life, and it was a life changing event for people who attended, but betting on myself is always a good bet.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yes. And I, I feel that that's universal. And, and what happens is, so many people aren't willing to bet on themselves, or they forget. You know, and, and I think a lot of the things that you provide through Ladyboss help reminds people or bring that awareness out in them. And you have an upcoming retreat speaking of right, so we know you're good at it because the bank was willing to give you money. And I have to say I was actually even kind of surprised that they they gave you money for an event I was. So tell us about Flow, the retreat that you have coming up in March.

Laura Caroon:  

Yes. So you know, we've been talking a lot about burnout this year. And we want to be part of the solution. So that's part of the reason why we created Flow, our first ever Ladyboss retreat. We're so excited about this. So this year's retreat is gonna features speakers and breakout sessions that really are meant to kind of reignite your passions can connect you with other amazing women, professional, ambitious women, give you the tools that you can take back home to help tackle whatever feels like it's blocking you. And to help you thrive. So we're very excited to have you as one of our keynote speakers, Michael, that's going to be fantastic. So the floor retreat is happening in March 3rd through 5th at the Grandview lodge in Nisswa Minnesota. And if you've heard of it, or you've

Michael Kithcart:  

It is a beautiful place. And I am so seen it, like, you know, is is beautiful, that area is just fantastic. So it's on the lake, it's in the trees. And we were out there actually, a few weeks ago in November, and it had just snowed. And it's just, it's idyllic. It's a great place. excited to be speaking at this retreat, not only because I love, you know, sharing positive messages and stories with women, but just to be in that environment. I mean, one of the other things around the pandemic is just missing that connection of being with really powerful people just you know, of mind and spirit. And so I'm just really looking forward to that retreat. And of course, we will put that link in the show notes because it's limited space. It's beautiful. It is gorgeous out at Grandview. And we would love to see you all there. I think I can speak for both of us on that. Right, Laura?

Laura Caroon:  

Absolutely. The link is LadybossMidwest.com/retreat.

Michael Kithcart:  

Love that. Okay, so what is your big, Oh my gosh, it would be so amazing if we did this with Ladyboss Midwest? What's that big vision?

Laura Caroon:  

You know, something that I always come back to is having a space for women to gather into to connect. So we have a thriving network of women online right now. But I would love to have a space where entrepreneurs can come and be together, we can host events, have speakers, or people can rent out and have their own trainings, maybe work from their clients. That's something that I would love to see happen. So also part of what we do at lady boss, we have a, a segment of Ladyboss called Ladyboss Creative. And it's like a kind of a mini agency where we; our goal is to help women own business and entrepreneurs, with their their marketing and their social media strategy and their website, things like that, to help them get from their idea to launched. And have it look beautiful and feel feel like them and feel like something they're excited to put out into the world.

Michael Kithcart:  

That's great. That's removing a barrier of why so many people don't get started, right? Because they don't know what they don't understand it. They're focused on the service or the product that they want to launch into the world. And so you're helping remove that barrier and make it happen.

Laura Caroon:  

Yes, exactly. So that's part of what we do. We also have Ladyboss Executives. So this is a group that is just starting, we're having kind of our first event in January, and it's for those women who are in those C suite, and senior leadership level positions to connect and to start making change in their companies. And and I would love to see, you know, those women really take off and change the face of business all across the Midwest and the country.

Michael Kithcart:  

Amen. Of that. Okay, so what gives you hope for 2022? What are you looking forward to?

Laura Caroon:  

Honestly, I mean, having a vaccine, and being able to connect again, like I've been able to know, do a little bit of in person things lately. And it feels so good to be back with people and to be back face to face and be connecting with entrepreneurs again, and having those in person deep conversations. So that makes me very excited about 2022. And I know we'll be doing a lot more connecting with women all across the Midwest.

Michael Kithcart:  

Yeah, that's great. Well, Laura Caroon thank you so much for spending time with us on the Champions of RISK Podcast. You gave a lot of information about resources and events and opportunities that are through Ladyboss Midwest. So how can we follow you and find you?

Laura Caroon:  

Yeah, so you can find Ladyboss Midwest online at ladybossmidwest.com and on social @LadybossMidwest. You can also find me @LauraCaroon. I'd love to connect with you.

Michael Kithcart:  

That's great. And we want to see you all at the upcoming retreat, Flow Retreat in March.

Laura Caroon:  

Absolutely. Looking forward.

Michael Kithcart:  

Me too. Thank you so much, Laura.

Laura Caroon:  

Thanks, Michael. This has been really fun.

Michael Kithcart:  

If you want to make big things happen in '22, consistent personal development can help you actualize those goals while enhancing your well being. Because we need both. Invest in yourself for the new year with Champion You Group Coaching. Each month I go live with members to highlight high performance habits that shift perspective, provide a new tool or resource and create action steps to reach desired outcomes. If you're looking for personal development payments, and be part of a high performance community, start the new year off right and give yourself a Champion You Group Coaching membership. We meet virtually the first Wednesday of every month, see details in the show notes or go to MichaelWKithcart.com/group.

 

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